Working Group Minutes / Archives / Soy / 2 May 2013

Minutes

Soybean working group and Sunflower and Soybean Forum (SSF)

joint meeting held on 2 May 2013 at 10:00, at the offices of the Protein Research Foundation, 49 River Road, Woodmead



  1. Opening

    The meeting was opened by a prayer, offered by Mr Frans Potgieter.

  2. Welcome

    The Chairperson, Mr GJH Scholtemeijer, welcomed all to the meeting.

  3. Attendance

    Present

    Mr GJH Scholtemeijer Chairperson
    Mr J Botma Producer: Free State
    Mr L Büchner Profert
    Mr W Cronjé OAC
    Ms AS de Beer ARC-GCI
    Mr G de Beer PRF
    Dr J de Kock PRF
    Dr J Dreyer PRF
    Mr CJ du Plessis Producer: KwaZulu-Natal
    Mr J du Preez PRF Consultant
    Ms P Fourie GrainSA
    Mr NJ Hawkins SAGIS
    Mr G Keun Chief Executive Officer
    Mr ID Lamprecht Dept Agric Mpumalanga
    Mr K-J Leeuw ARC-API
    Dr A Nel ARC-GCI
    Dr W Otto NWK
    Mr FAS Potgieter PRF
    Mr T Prinsloo ARC-GCI
    Ms M Scheepers DAFF
    Ms JM Truter ARC-GCI
    Dr W van der Walt OAC
    Dr P van Twisk PvT Consultants
    Ms R van Vuuren Madumbi
    Mr W van Wyk PRF Contractor
    Mr APG van Zyl Producer: Orange River Scheme
    Ms E Harmse OPDT/PRF Contractor

    Apologies

    Mr D Boshoff AFMA
    Dr E Briedenhann OAC/PRF
    Mr H Conradie Producer: Mpumalanga
    Dr L du Plessis PRF Contractor
    Mr WT Engelbrecht K2Agri
    Prof D Fourie North West University
    Mr C Havenga PRF Contractor
    Mr J Henning University of the Free State
    Mr M Janse van Rensburg Dept Agric Mpumalanga
    Mr C Joubert NAMC
    Mr R Kuschke Kleinkaroosaad
    Dr SC Lamprecht ARC-IPP
    Mr CJ Louw GrainSA
    Ms W Louw SAGL
    Dr D Marais University of Pretoria
    Mr H Otto Producer: North West
    Mr G Roos Producer: Mpumalanga
    Mr D Strydom University of the Free State
    Dr G Thompson ARC-GCI
    Ms KJ Tshupe OAC
    Mr C van der Merwe Suidweslandbou
    Mr D van der Westhuizen Producer: Mpumalanga
    Mr C van Rooyen Landbouweekblad
    Mr AJ van Vuuren NWK
    Mr L Verhoef Agratech Trade
    Dr SG Ybema NWK

  4. Personalia

    None reported.

  5. Confirmation of agenda

    The agenda was accepted as it stood.

  6. Approval of minutes

    1. Approval of the minutes of the Joint Meeting held on 5 March 2013; and referral to webpage

      Resolved:

      1. That the minutes of the Joint Meeting, that was held on 5 March 2013, be accepted as a true and fair reflection of that meeting, after a number of changes had been effected.
      2. That the minutes of the Joint Meeting, that was held on 5 March 2013, be referred to the website of the Protein Research Foundation, for publication.

  7. General overview

    1. Crop estimates

      The Chairperson tabled the documents reflecting the third production forecast of summer crops for 2013, as well as the summary document that had been prepared for the meeting, and called on Ms Scheepers to comment.

      Ms Scheepers said according to the third production estimate, an area of 516 500 hectares had been planted to soybeans, with a production forecast of 851 000 tons. She noted that she had compiled a table, in which the first, second and third production esti­mates of soybeans per province were reflected. She said while the third production estimate did not differ from the second production estimate, there was a significant difference between the first and third production estimates.

      Ms Scheepers said the production estimate for the Free State had been adjusted downwards with 43 000 tons to 279 500 tons, while the production estimate for North West Province had been adjusted downwards with 11 000 tons to 33 000 tons, and that for Mpuma­langa had been adjusted downwards with 10 250 tons to 358 750 tons. She noted that the production estimate for the Northern Cape had been adjusted upwards with 4 500 tons to 6 000 tons, as the soybean hectares planted in that province had been increased by 2 000, following on consultations with various roleplayers. She said the first production forecast of 914 350 tons had been amended downwards by 7%, or with 63 350 tons.

      Ms Scheepers said the largest soybean crop of 358 750 tons was forecast for Mpumalanga, followed by the Free State, with 322 500 tons, KwaZulu-Natal with 80 000 tons, Limpopo with 55 000 tons and North West, with 33 000 tons. The remainder of the provinces represented 1% of the soybean crop, or 6 750 tons.

      Ms Scheepers said an average yield of 1,65 tons per hectare was expected, and added that this was 3% more than the previous three-year average of 1,60 tons per hectare, 3% less than the previous five-year average of 1,7 tons per hectare, and in line with the previous ten-year average.

      Mr Botma remarked that 2013 had been one of the more difficult production seasons. He said green stems and pods had hampered harvesting.

      Ms Scheepers said according to the latest production estimate for 2013, the area planted to sunflower seed was estimated at 504 700 hectares, while production was estimated at 554 500 tons, as opposed to the first estimate of 624 210 tons.

      Ms Scheepers said the production estimate for the Free State had been adjusted downwards with 33 000 tons to 275 000 tons, while the production estimate for North West Province had been adjusted downwards with 26 250 tons to 175 000 tons, and that for Limpopo had been adjusted downwards with 9 900 tons, to 89 100 tons.

      Ms Scheepers said the largest sunflower crop of 275 000 tons was forecast for the Free State, followed by North West, with 175 000 tons, and Limpopo with 89 100 tons. The remainder of the provinces represented 3% of the sunflower crop, or 15 400 tons.

      Ms Scheepers noted that an average yield of 1,10 tons per hectare was expected, and added that this was 12% less than the previous three-year average of 1,25 tons per hectare, 17% less than the previous five-year average of 1,32 tons per hectare, and 11% less than the previous ten-year average. She said according to the data she had at her disposal, the 2008 production season's average yield of 1,55 tons sunflower per hectare had been the highest.

      Mr Hawkins said although the average yield of sunflowers per hectare seemed low, when compared to other crops, it had to be kept in mind that sunflowers were mainly produced on dryland.

      Dr van der Walt remarked that sunflowers were more often than not treated like an orphan crop. He said very good yields could be produced if sunflowers were planted during the correct planting period.

    2. SAGIS


      (Resolution 7.2.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

      Mr Hawkins presented an overview of the national and international supply and demand situation of soybeans and sunflowers, and of the situation with regard to the Crop Estimates Committee's (CEC) estimates and SAGIS deliveries. He also provided information on sunflower and soybean imports and exports, consumption, stocks and local and international prices. Cognisance was taken that the data could also be accessed at the website address www.sagis.org.za.

      Mr Hawkins said he had found it quite interesting that the total value of all vegetable oils imported during 2012 amounted to ZAR7 438 939 000. The Chairperson mentioned that the Protein Research Foundation had done a comprehensive study on the value of oil and oilcake imports, and had taken cognisance of the fact that billions of rands were annually lost to foreign currency. He said he would provide Mr Hawkins with a copy of the findings of that study.

      Cognisance was taken of the SAGIS Monthly Bulletin dated 25 March 2013, and the SAGIS Weekly Bulletin dated 11 April 2013.

      Noted:

      1. That the findings of the Protein Research Foundation's study on the value of oil and oilcake imports would be provided to Mr Hawkins.

        Mr Keun
        Mr Hawkins


    3. Targets – 2020

      The Chairperson suggested that the target of an average yield of 2,5 ton soybeans per hectare on one million hectares by 2020 remain unchanged. He said it would be quite difficult to set a target for local sunflower production by 2020.

    4. Weather forecast

      Mr Botma presented a graphic overview of the expected cloud formation and the development of weather patterns during the next few months. He also gave an overview of the rainfall during the 2013 production season, as opposed to that of previous years.

    5. Oilseeds information


      (Resolution 7.5.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

      Mr Keun reported that the first edition of the local oilseeds newsletter was about to be published.

      Noted:

      1. That cognisance be taken of the oilseeds industry's initiative to regularly publish information related to sunflower, soybean and groundnut production.

        Mr Keun
        Members

  8. Market information

    1. Local and international soybean prices

      The Chairperson remarked that Mr Hawkins had already given an indication of current prices, both locally and internationally.

      Mr Botma asked whether there would be a possibility that the price of imported soybeans, and not imported soybean oilcake, would be used to calculate producer prices, once all the additional processing capacity had come on stream. The Chairperson said such a scenario may very well become a reality.

    2. Local and international sunflower prices

      No report back.

  9. Producer matters

    1. Soybeans

      1. KwaZulu-Natal

        1. General

          Mr du Plessis reported that harvesting had commenced in KwaZulu-Natal, and that green stems were hampering the harvesting process. He said in addition, grading problems had been caused by weeds germinating and growing, that resulted in discoloured soybeans.

          Mr du Plessis said actual yields did not meet the producers' original expectations, especially on dryland soybeans, where damage had been caused by a heat wave in January. He considered the CEC's third production forecast of 80 000 tons for KwaZulu-Natal to be reasonably on target.

        2. Soybean Yield Competition

          Mr Du Plessis reported that twenty fields of soybeans had been entered into the Soybean Yield Competition. He said the producers regarded the competition in a positive light.

          The Chairperson noted that the competition was aimed at attaining maximum yields. Mr du Plessis said producers were encouraged to use innovative ideas to attain those yields.

      2. Mpumalanga and Gauteng

        1. General

          (Resolution 9.1.2.1.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

          The Chairperson said according to the CEC, 470 000 hectares had been planted to maize, and 205 000 hectares to soybeans, in Mpumalanga. He noted that this reflected a satisfactory proportion of 70:30.

          Mr Lamprecht said he was satisfied with the CEC's third production estimate of 205 000 hectares and their production estimate of 358 750 tons soybeans. He mentioned that he had received reports of average yields of between 1,5 tons and 3,0 tons per hectare. Mr Büchner said he expected that yields in Mpumalanga would be higher than the long term average.

          Mr Keun said according to Mr Roos, average yields of 1,2 tons to 2,5 tons per hectare had been harvested in Carolina, 1,5 to 2,8 tons per hectare in Hendrina, 1,5 to 3,2 tons per hectare in Middelburg, 1,5 to 3,2 tons per hectare in Stoffberg, and 1,5 to 3,8 tons per hectare in Wonderfontein and Belfast.

          Mr van Wyk said in his view, the drought during February and March had negatively affected the yields in certain areas.

          Cognisance was taken that feedback would be provided at the next meeting on the fertiliser trials at Mr Roos's farm.

          Noted:

          1. That feedback would be provided at the next meeting on the fertiliser trials at Mr Roos's farm.

            Mr Roos
            Dr de Kock
            Joint Meeting


      3. North West and Limpopo Province

        1. General

          Cognisance was taken that 22 000 hectares had been planted to soybeans in North West, with an expected production of 33 000 tons; and that 20 000 hectares had been planted to soybeans in Limpopo, with an expected production of 55 000 tons, according to the third production forecast.

          Mr Potgieter said in his view the CEC's estimates were on target. He mentioned that green stems were also slowing down the harvesting process in Limpopo and North West.

          Mr Büchner said the problem of green stems and green pods could be alleviated by the correct cultivar choice, the correct planting date and the harvesting process. He said both determinate and indeterminate cultivars should be planted, soybeans should be planted at the same time as maize, and harvesting done from 12:00 to 18:00, at a slower speed. Mr Potgieter agreed that the issue of green stems and pods had to be managed properly.

          Dr Dreyer reported that Mr Jozeph du Plessis had informed him that he had harvested average yields of 1,0 to 1,3 tons soy­beans per hectare on his farm in Schweizer-Reneke. He added that Mr du Plessis had, for the first time in many years, har­vested maize yields of less than 3 tons per hectare. He said according to Mr du Plessis, soybeans following soybeans had suffered severe yield penalties. Mr van Wyk said soybeans extracted extremely high levels of moisture from the soil, with the result that soil moisture conditions would have been well below the ideal for the second soybean crop.

      4. Free State

        1. General

          The Chairperson noted that 1 230 000 hectares of maize had been planted in the Free State, as opposed to the 215 000 hectares that had been planted to soybeans.

          Mr Botma reported that soybean yields in certain parts of the Free State did not meet expectations during the 2013 pro­duction season. He said he had already completed the harvesting process well before the NAMPO Harvest Week, which was not usually the case. He noted that the average yield per hectare had been negatively affected by pod shatter. He said al­though Senwes had estimated the average soybean yield at 1,04 tons per hectare in their area, his impression was that the average yield could be less than that, as there were any number of first-time soybean producers in that area. He however added that the yields may be as forecast, in the more traditional soybean producing areas in the Free State.

          Ms Fourie reported that VKB expected average to above average soybean yields in their area. The Chairperson said it seemed as if the CEC's soybean production forecast for the Free State could remain unchanged.

          Mr Botma said the challenge remained to continue increasing the soybean hectares in the Free State every year.

      5. Eastern Cape, Northern Cape and Southwestern Districts

        1. General

          The Chairperson ruled that Resolutions 9.1.5.1.1.and 9.1.5.1.2 of 2 May 2013 be held in abeyance.

          Mr van Zyl reported that the average yields in the Northern Cape varied between 3,4 and close to 5,0 tons per hectare. He said he expected an average yield of 4,0 tons per hectare for that area.

          Mr van Zyl said he had rented out a piece of land to a tenant, who had burnt and ploughed some fields, that had apparently resulted in an infestation of root-knot nematodes. He noted that he would monitor this infestation, and report back on the matter at the next meeting.

          Mr van Zyl said he had planted a field of oats, that he had ploughed into the soil before planting groundnuts. He mentioned that he had sprayed a mixture of molasses, magnesium and boron on a field of yellowing groundnuts, with incredible results. He said he had rinsed an empty drum of molasses on his lawn, that had resulted in lush growth. He noted that molasses apparently stimulated organisms in the soil.

          Dr Dreyer confirmed that molasses stimulated organisms in the soil. Dr Nel said nematologists advised producers to plant a winter crop, such as oats or wheat, in the event of root-knot nematode infestations on their summer crops. He added that tilling, however, destroyed the natural enemies of root-knot nematodes in the soil. He suggested that a nematologist be invited to address one of the future meetings.

          Dr de Kock said it was a known fact that root-knot nematodes caused problems in sandy soils. Dr Dreyer reported that Prof Fourie was currently involved in research to evaluate a methodology by means of which the level of resistance of soybean cultivars to root-knot nematodes could be identified.

          Ms van Vuuren said apparently some producers in the Free State had used the nematicide Avicta as a seed treatment during the 2013 production season, but added that no feedback on progress achieved had been received as yet.

          Noted:

          1. That feedback would be provided at a future meeting on the infestation of root-knot nematodes on a portion of Mr van Zyl's farm.

            Mr van Zyl
            Joint Meeting

          2. That a nematologist be invited to address one of the future Combined Meetings.

            Dr de Kock
            Joint Meeting


      6. General

        No general matters reported on.

    2. Sunflowers

      1. KwaZulu-Natal, Western and Eastern Cape

        Cognisance was taken that no sunflowers had been planted in KwaZulu-Natal, the Western and Eastern Cape during the 2013 production season.

      2. Mpumalanga and Gauteng

        Cognisance was taken that 6 600 hectares had been planted to sunflower in Mpumalanga in the 2013 production season, with an expected crop of 10 230 tons, as opposed to the 10 000 hectares that had been planted during the 2012 production season, and the final crop of 13 500 tons.

        Cognisance was also taken that 3 900 hectares had been planted to sunflower in Gauteng in the 2013 production season, with an expected crop of 5 070 tons, as opposed to the 3 000 hectares that had been planted during the 2012 production season, and the final crop of 3 900 tons.

      3. North West and Limpopo

        Cognisance was taken that 175 000 hectares sunflower had been planted in North West, with an expected crop of 175 000 tons, while 99 000 hectares had been planted in Limpopo, with an expected crop of 89 100 tons.

        Ms Fourie reported that approximately 40% of the sunflowers had been harvested to date in the southern parts of North West Province, with average yields per hectare varying between 0,1 to 2,0 tons. She said sunflower had outperformed maize in the drought conditions.

        Ms Fourie said although harvesting had not yet started in the northern parts of North West, it was expected that the yields would be negatively affected by the drought, but to a lesser extent than the yields of the southern parts.

        Dr Otto agreed that 2013 had been a difficult season, with sunflower planting times varying from very early in the season to very late in the season. He said yields varied from absolutely nothing to average and even above average. He noted that the average yield in the western areas of North West would probably be less that one ton per hectare, while the average yield in the areas to the east of Lichtenburg could possibly be around two tons per hectare.

      4. Free State

        Cognisance was taken that 220 000 hectares had been planted to sunflower in the Free State, and that the CEC's third production estimate for that area was 275 000 tons.

      5. General

        The Chairperson suggested that a representative of GrainSA and some sunflower producers be invited to future meetings, to provide input on sunflower production conditions and challenges. Dr de Kock said a person like Mr Johan Potgieter from Pannar could also provide valuable information on local sunflower production.

        Noted:

        1. That representatives of GrainSA, sunflower seed companies and some sunflower producers be invited to future meetings, so as to provide input on sunflower production conditions and challenges.

          Mr Keun,
          Joint Meeting

  10. Research

    1. Soybeans

      1. National cultivar trials 2012-2013

        Ms de Beer reported that the national cultivar trials were currently being harvested, and that the harvesting process should be completed in the second week of May. She said the harvesting period had to be curtailed, due to the heat and drought conditions. She confirmed that green stems and pods, as well as pod shatter, had caused problems.

        Ms de Beer said as was the case with some commercial plantings, it had been noted in the cultivar trials, especially at the Vaalharts location, that vegetative growth was extremely lush under irrigation, but that pod fill was very weak. She reported that some of the producers in the Vaalharts area had not been able to harvest 0,500 ton per hectare. She added that one trial could not be harvested at all, and would have to be written off.

        Dr de Kock confirmed that root-knot nematodes were active in the soils at Vaalharts. He said these nematodes stunted the plant's growth, and did not only affect the yield. Ms de Beer said she would ascribe the weak pod fill to the heat, but added that she would have to make sure of the facts. Mr van Zyl said although temperatures in the region of 44°C were not un­common in the Orange River Scheme area, problems due to weak pod fill had not been reported. Mr van Wyk mentioned that he would rather blame the weak pod fill on ineffective irrigation scheduling.

        Ms Fourie reported that GrainSA had received many enquiries from producers who were keen to plant soybeans in the west­ern areas of the country. Ms de Beer said national cultivars trials were planted only at Potchefstoom, Bothaville and Vaal­harts. Mr Keun reported that the ARC-GCI had indicated that they would submit a revised project application and budget, that would include soybean cultivar evaluation trials in the western production areas.

      2. Rust

        1. Rust trap crops

          Mr de Beer reported that rust infection had been limited to the production areas on the eastern side of the Drakensberg during the 2013 production season. He said rust infection had only been detected at the Pannar research farm in Greytown, on the vegetable soybeans at Cedara, and at Vryheid, Normandien and Dirkiesdorp.

      3. Sclerotinia

        1. Sclerotinia 2012-2013 production season

          (Resolution 10.1.3.1.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

          Cognisance was taken of the proceedings of the National Sclerotinia Initiative meeting, that was held in Bloomington, Minnesota during January 2013.

          Mr Keun reported that Dr van der Walt had agreed to summarise those papers relating to oilseeds, and added that that summary would be made available to the members.

          The Chairperson remarked that the National Sclerotinia Initiative was conducting intensive and comprehensive research into the issue of Sclerotinia, and was very well funded. He said he did not believe that any aspects of the South African expe­rience of Sclerotinia were unique to this country, such that they were not being addressed by the Sclerotinia Initiative.

          Dr de Kock called on all producers to participate in the CEC's annual Sclerotinia survey during May. He said although it had been stated that problems with Sclerotinia were on the increase, this was not reflected in the results of surveys done during the past three years, possibly due to insufficient participitation by producers.

          Ms Fourie said GrainSA would assist the CEC in their communication with producers about the Sclerotinia survey.

          Dr de Kock noted that the company Philagro had registered the product Sumisclex for the control of Sclerotinia on sunflower. He said Pannar was investigating the possibility of breeding sunflower cultivars with resistance to Sclerotinia. He added that good results were being achieved with Trichoderma spp., by both Madumbi and Philagro, but cautioned that control was not achieved overnight.

          Mr Keun reported that Dr Gulya and his colleagues had confirmed that the South African sunflower seed companies were closely involved with the work at the National Sclerotinia Initiative, and regularly visited the Initiative, so as to stay informed on progress achieved.

          Ms van Vuuren confirmed that progress was being achieved on Sclerotinia control, especially when Trichoderma spp. was used as a seed treatment. She said this was considered to be more cost-effective than spraying the crops. She mentioned that an integrated approach, where certain chemical seed treatments were used together with Trichoderma spp., provided protection right up to the harvesting stage. She reported that a producer had achieved a significant decrease in pathogen transmission and infection in his soils, three years after adopting an integrated approach in his crop rotation system.

          Mr van Wyk said the number of enquiries about Sclerotinia had increased, since soybean production had taken off locally. He emphasised that Sclerotinia infection usually occurred in plants that had canopied really well, which implied that a good soybean producer was involved. He said in his opinion, Sclerotinia was the one disease that could force soybean production on the Highveld onto its knees.

          Dr de Kock said in his view, chemical treatments that were used to manage Sclerotinia effectively in other countries, would not necessarily have the desired results locally. He added that more research had to be done locally on Trichoderma spp., before proper guidelines could be provided to producers. He said while South Africa could rely on the plant breeding done in North America and other countries, chemical control and related matters had to be researched locally, with local production practices taken into account.

          Ms van Vuuren confirmed that Madumbi had compiled a list of treatments that were compatible with Trichoderma spp. She mentioned that triazoles could, for example, impact negatively on Trichoderma spp. in spray tank mixtures. She said there were alternative ways to use Trichoderma spp., when seed had been treated with a triazole, or a combination of other chemical treatments as well as triazoles. She confirmed that Trichoderma spp. could also be applied in the seed furrow. She said Madumbi had released an inoculant containing the WB74 strain, that included Trichoderma spp. in the formulation.

          Dr de Kock mentioned that the July meeting of the Soybean Working Group would include a scientific and technical discussion on Sclerotinia.

          Noted:

          1. That the summary of the papers relating to oilseeds presented at the National Sclerotinia Initiative meeting, during January 2013, would be made available to the members in due course.

            Mr Keun
            Dr van der Walt
            Joint Meeting


      4. Rhizobium – Feedback


        (Resolutions 10.1.4.1 and 10.1.4.2 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

        Cognisance was taken that Dr Hassen's report on the project "Why does inoculation of soybeans sometimes fail? A survey of the quality of locally produced inoculants, their use and possible remediation" would be included with the SciTech Joint Meeting's documents.

        Ms Fourie reported that Mr Louw of GrainSA had met with the ARC-PPRI, in order to discuss possible field trials with certain inoculants containing strains other than WB74.

        Noted:

        1. That Dr Hassen's report on the project "Why does inoculation of soybeans sometimes fail? A survey of the quality of locally produced inoculants, their use and possible remediation" would be included with the documentation of the the SciTech Joint Meeting.

          Mr Keun,
          Joint Meeting


      5. Biofuels

        Cognisance was taken of Dr du Plessis' report titled "Nuusberigte en tendense in die bio-brandstof en oliesadebedryf, Eerste Kwartaal, 1 Januarie 2013 tot 30 Maart 2013", and the articles "Vooruitsigte vir biobrandstof lyk goed, maar..." and "Biofuel firms' perseverance set to pay off".

      6. Topics for web searches

        The Chairperson invited the members to submit topics for web searches.

      7. Grading regulations for soybeans

        Ms Fourie confirmed that GrainSA had provided feedback on the grading regulations for soybeans. The matter was con­sidered to be concluded.

    2. Sunflower

      1. Sclerotinia survey

        Dr de Kock called on all producers to participate in the CEC's annual Sclerotinia survey.

      2. Sunflower value chain study

        The Chairperson confirmed that the Bureau for Food and Agricultural Policy (BFAP) had been requested to do a study on the sunflower value chain.

      3. Sunflower grading regulations


        (Resolution 10.2.3.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

        Ms Fourie confirmed that GrainSA had provided feedback on the grading regulations for sunflower. The matter was considered to be concluded.

  11. Saad

    1. Soybeans


      (Resolutions 11.1.1 and 11.1.2 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

      Cognisance was taken of the paper "Investigating the effects of location on seed performance", that had been presented at the World Soybean Research Conference (WSRC) IX.

    2. Sunflower


      (Resolution 11.2.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

      Mr Keun confirmed that representatives from sunflower seed companies will be invited to the Joint Meetings meetings in future. The matter was considered to be concluded.

  12. Tegnology transfer

    1. Information Days 2013: Dates, feedback and promotion

      Cognisance was taken of the following dates:

      Nampo Harvest Day 14-17 May 2013
      BFAP baseline report, Cape Town 2 August 2013
      BFAP baseline report, Pretoria 6 August 2013
      Information Day, Nampo, Bothaville (Mr Jan Botma) 20 August 2013
      "No Till"-conference, KwaZulu-Natal 3-5 September 2013

  13. Additional matters

    1. Items for publication on the PRF and oilseeds industries' websites – news snippets and colour photographs

      The Chairperson urged the members to submit news items and colour photographs for publication on the websites of the PRF and the oilseeds industry.

    2. Articles


      (Resolutions 13.2.1 to 13.2.3 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013 and resolution 10.7.3 of the Technology Committee meeting of 30 January 2013)

      Cognisance was taken of the articles included as part of Annexure J.

      Dr de Kock suggested that the article "Soybean rust – managing the risk of resistance to triazole fungicides" be republished in October.

      Mr Cronjé briefly informed the members on the latest developments in the local soybean for human nutrition industry.

      The Chairperson requested that the Technology Committee, the Oilseeds Advisory Committee and the Research Priority Committee be requested to follow up on the various interesting papers delivered at the WSRC IX. He mentioned Dr Ken Dashiell's paper on popula­tions of various countries having to eke out an existence on R10,00 (US$1,25) per day as an example.

      Resolutions:

      1. That the article "Soybean rust – managing the risk of resistance to triazole fungicides" be republished in October.

        Dr de Kock
        Joint Meeting

      2. That the Technology Committee, the Oilseeds Advisory Committee and the Research Priority Committee be requested to follow up on the various interesting papers delivered at the WSRC IX.

        Mr Keun
        Technology Committee
        OAC; RPC


    3. Speakers at forthcoming meetings


      (Resolution 13.3.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013, resolution 10.3.2 of the Technology Committee meeting of 30 January 2013 and resolution 27.1 of the PRF Board meeting minutes of 12 and 13 March 2013)

      Cognisance was taken of the list of possible speakers at forthcoming meetings. Mr Keun confirmed that Mr Tony da Costa had been invited to attend the Joint Meetings.

      Resolution:

      1. That cognisance be taken of the list of possible speakers at future meetings:
        • Ms Truter, entomologist at the ARC-GCI and Dr Annemie Erasmus;
        • Prof Johnnie van den Berg;
        • Prof KJ Kunert;
        • Mr Antonie Delport, Syngenta; and
        • Dr Blignaut, CSIR.

        Dr de Kock
        Joint Meeting


    4. Sunflower Week in Review

      Cognisance was taken of the various editions of The Sunflower, Sunflower Week in Review and Sunflower Highlights, included as Annexure K.

    5. Sunflower disease manual


      (Resolution 13.5.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

      Cognisance was taken that the revision of the sunflower disease manual would be held in abeyance, until such time Dr Flett's survey of sunflower diseases had been finalised. The matter was considered to be concluded.

    6. Legislation : Farming vehicles on public roads – feedback


      (Resolution 13.6.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

      Ms Fourie reported that AgriSA and the Department of Transport were handling the issue of farming vehicles, such as tractors, being driven on public roads. Mr Keun said he had informed GrainSA in writing that concern had been expressed about the issue at a pre­vious Joint Meeting. The matter was considered to be concluded.

    7. Research: Soybeans under irrigation


      (Resolution 8.16.1.1 of the Technology Committee minutes of 30 January 2013)

      Dr de Kock reported that one of Dr Marais' students at the University of Pretoria was doing a literature study on soybean production under irrigation.

      Resolution:

      1. That cognisance be taken that a literature study on soybean production under irrigation was being awaited.

        Dr de Kock
        Joint Meeting


    8. Merit awards


      (Resolution 13.4.1 of the Joint Meeting minutes of 5 March 2013)

      Mr Keun reported that nominations had not yet been submitted for merit awards. The matter was held in abeyance.

      Noted:

      1. That cognisance be taken that nominations were being awaited for awards to deserving individuals for meritorious contributions to the oilseeds and protein seeds industries.

        Mr Keun
        Joint Meeting

  14. Date of next meeting

    The date of the Special SciTech Joint Meeting was confirmed as 24 July 2013. Dr de Kock provided a brief overview of the planned agenda for the day.

  15. Closure

    The Chairperson thanked the members for their attendance at, and active participation in, the meeting. There being no further matters for discussion, the meeting was closed at 13:25.